SEO checklist for older posts

@Liz Berg and I recorded a podcast interview for old-timers like us (ha!) who have tons of content to comb through from the archives. It will be published tomorrow morning, so give it a listen! In the meantime, here is a helpful checklist Liz compiled if you need a guide to help you optimize older content (thanks, Liz!):

  • Look at one of your posts that you want to improve and google that generic recipe and see what others are sharing on the topic. Don’t copy but you can generate some ideas of what to educate your audience on about this type of food they are making.

  • Give the post some SEO magic. SEMrush or another paid site. There are free options as well. You can use Google to do some keyword search and see what kind of words are out there. It’s almost too obvious of a source! It’s a great way to inspire your writing content.

  • Keyword search - find keywords that aren’t as competitive to make your recipe shine brighter from the rest of the pack and what sets your recipe apart from other recipes that might make someone want to check your content out. Avoid keyword stuffing!

  • Improve photographs.

  • Remove content that isn’t relevant

  • Find something to explain or teach on. Share how to do a process, this will help improve user experience to your audience. Explain a cooking or baking tip in more detail that is done within the recipe being used so they understand how to do it and then can apply the technique.

  • Share some links from your site that are similar to this recipe that your audience might want to check out and include this internal links in a list or as a suggestion within the paragraphs. You could add value to your post with interlinking a sauce or a process to the food with this homemade tip, then link it in.

  • FAQ’s - think ahead of some questions a reader might ask about the recipe and be sure you have already provided that detail within the body of the post.

  • Be sure to have a pinnable image available.

  • Affiliate Amazon links can be added to posts

  • Site speed is important to improve

Thanks, Megan! It looks like I need to do a wee bit of editing to make this read better. Let me send you a slightly revised version and see what you think! If it’s already gone out, no worries!

  • Look at one of the posts that you want to improve, google that generic recipe name, and see what others are sharing on the topic. Don’t copy but use it to generate some ideas of what to educate your audience on about this type of food they are making.

  • Give the post some SEO magic. Use SEMrush or another paid site. There are free options as well. You can use Google to do some keyword searches and see what kind of potential keywords are out there. It’s almost too obvious of a source! It’s a great way to inspire your writing content.

  • Keyword search - find keywords that aren’t as competitive to make your recipe shine brighter than the rest of the pack and set your recipe apart. This might make someone want to check out more of your content. Avoid keyword stuffing!

  • Improve photographs.

  • Remove content that isn’t relevant

  • Find something to explain or teach about. Share how to do a process, as this will help improve your audience’s user experience. Explain a cooking or baking tip in more detail that is done within the recipe itself. Help your reader understand how to do it and then they can apply the technique.

  • Share some links from your site that are similar to the featured recipe that your audience might want to check out. Include these internal links in a list or as a suggestion within the paragraphs. Add value to your post with interlinking a sauce that could work with the dish, or another post that details one of the techniques used in the recipe.

  • FAQ’s - think ahead of some questions a reader might ask about the recipe and be sure you have already provided that detail within the body of the post.

  • Be sure to have a pinnable image available.

  • Affiliate Amazon links can be added to posts.

  • Site speed is important to improve.

Absolutely! Tweak as needed and repost here if you don’t mind. I’ll grab it from here and add it to your show notes. Thank you!!

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I am sort of a newbie to SEO and struggle with the whole keyword thing. What exactly does it mean to:

“Give the post some SEO magic. Use SEMrush or another paid site. There are free options as well. You can use Google to do some keyword searches and see what kind of potential keywords are out there. It’s almost too obvious of a source! It’s a great way to inspire your writing content.” ??

Thanks!!

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Hey Kim! Great question!

I’m tagging @Liz to see if she wants to add more. There’s also the podcast episode she was on with @megan that has lots of info too! You can find that at this link - https://www.eatblogtalk.com/lizberg -, or on your podcast player with Eat Blog Talk.

SEMrush is a platform/tool that offers tons of help on doing SEO keyword research and more. You can find more details on their website - https://www.semrush.com/.

As far as Google, I assume what she meant is that if you search Google on desktop, it will tell you the number of results they keyword brings up. It’s a quick and free way to do research.

This is what it looks like:

Hi, Kim,

What I do is think of a couple of phrases I might use if I was searching for the recipe post I’m developing. I was updating my pumpkin roll recipe yesterday, so I put pumpkin roll into SEMRush and Ubersuggest (a good free site). From doing that, I saw that the keywords pumpkin roll recipe and Libbys pumpkin roll (without an apostrophe!) were within my reach for ranking. Meaning they didn’t get a zillion searches a day. So I made sure I used both terms once or twice in my post content and/or headings. Hope that helps!

I think just knowing which keywords you should be using within the blog post is really important and you can get help with that by using SEMrush (paid tool) or just by using Google. So if you are creating a blog post about Instant Pot Spaghetti, for example, type “Instant Pot Spaghetti” into Google and you’ll see these questions pop up on page 1:


And you can structure some of your content around those questions. There are other free keyword tools you can use like ubersuggest.com where you can type in “Instant Pot Spaghetti” and get information about this keyphrase:

Does that help, @Kim ? Let me know if you need help dissecting what you’re looking at in the above graphic because that can definitely be a hangup for people, too. There are a lot of letters and numbers to sort through.

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Megan! That is definitely helpful. Thank you so much. As far as the numbers go, is there a search volume “ideal” number to look for? Or a range?

I may come back and ask about a specific recipe to see what keywords would be the best choices. Would be willing to kind of walk me through choosing great keywords for an actual post?

Kim

Hi Kim! You’ll want to find a good balance between a keyword with a huge search volume and 0. I don’t have a formula for this, but maybe someone else could hop in and contribute here. I always use my gut. Great answer, right? :smile:

Another thing I keep an eye on is keyword difficulty (KD), which on some platforms is called SEO Difficulty (SD). A KD of 50-80 is a good range to look for, but whether or not you look more toward 50 or 80 depends on a few factors such as how established your site is and whether or not Google looks upon your site favorably. From what I understand you’ll want to look for lower KD numbers the newer your blog is.

I hope this helps! Oh and here’s an article that explains it way better than I did:

https://moz.com/community/q/what-is-a-good-keyword-difficulty-score

Again, I’m not an SEO expert but I’m happy to chat with you about the limited knowledge I do have! :joy: